Sucker Punch

Posted in DieselPunk, Movie, SteamPunk on July 24th, 2011 by Dr. Warthan
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Sucker Punch is an American action-fantasy film written by Steve Shibuya and Zack Snyder, and directed by Snyder. Sucker Punch features an ensemble female cast that includes Emily Browning, Abbie Cornish, Jena Malone, Vanessa Hudgens and Jamie Chung. The film follows a young girl in the 1950’s about to be lobotomized as she attempts to escape an asylum with her inmate friends.

Watch the trailer.  As you can see, there’s a lot of Steampunk influence in there.  In fact, this movie has more Steampunk in it than many other pure Steampunk imaginings (like Riese Kingdom Falling, for example).  Snyder has described the film as “Alice in Wonderland with machine guns”, including dragons, B-52 bombers and brothels. Snyder’s wife and producing partner Deborah Snyder concludes, “in the end, it’s about this girl’s survival and what she needs to do to be able to cope.”

“Sucker Punch” is an epic action fantasy taht takes us into the vivid imagination of a young girl whose dream world provides the ultimate escape from her darker reality.  Unrestrained by the boundaries of time and place, she is free to go where her mind takes her, and her incredible adventures blur the lines between what’s real and what is imaginary.

Dr. Warthan’s Review: ΩΩΩΩΩ – Five Omega’s
That’s right, I own it on Blu-Ray!  I love movies that set the mind free.  It’s on the same level as the Matrix and 300.  A definite must see and must own.

Via: Sucker Punch

Bioshock Infinite

Posted in Game, SteamPunk on August 18th, 2010 by Dr. Warthan
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Finally, a high-end pure Steampunk game.  Unlike Bioshock 1 & 2 which takes place between 1960 and 1968 making them Deiselpunk, Bioshock Infinite takes place in 1912 in the weaponized sky city of Columbia.  The failed utopia is reminiscent of the 1893 World’s Fair and is built on the idea of American exceptionalism.  Watch the trailer:

A moment’s respite. Elizabeth and Booker walk towards a bridge, when the familiar metallic clomp of a “Daddy” echoes around. This isn’t a mule, although it’s a more human Daddy than the diving suited huggables of rapture: a man’s face, black parted hair and elaborate moustache, peeks out above a suit that exaggerates his body. He has giant, crushing hands, pistons powering his movements. He’s mostly a power boss: bashing, grabbing, tearing. It’s clear that Elizabeth’s role is something of a co-op partner. Her and Booker’s powers combine to be more powerful than on their own, but she also seems to have more specificity about her uses. This fight is resolved when the pair of you bring the bridge crashing down on the Daddy’s body, slicing through the ground as the bridge support hits it. He scrambles at the crumbling structure with his oversized hands before sliding off Columbia.

BioShock and BioShock 2 sported multiple endings (good/evil) depending on the player’s ethical choices.  This made for a good interactive narrative, and a sound story altogether.  These games are also well-respected first person shooters.  Typically, I’m cautious with game purchases and prefer to rent them first, but based on my past experiences with the BioShock games, I will buy BioShock Infinite blind-folded.

Via: PC Gamer

Professor X Wheelchair and Bar (1875)

Posted in Art, SteamPunk, Technology on March 19th, 2010 by Dr. Warthan
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No matter how fun your next SteamPunk event is, chances are you’re going to be doing a lot of standing.  Daniel Valdez has the right idea.  He can sit down, pour himself drinks, and move about freely.  He’s not just wearing his technology, he’s making it work for him.

The Steampunk Professor Xavier Wheelchair by Daniel Valdez was made from a Victorian rocker from 1875, a Permobil C300 powered wheelchair, some pistons from a steelworks, an Arduino-based audio kit, and a drinks dispenser. You know, for the vodka and cranberry juice.

Via: Geekologie

Not to mention it’s a beautiful and creative piece of work.  Seriously, I want one.

Nautilus

Posted in SteamPunk on August 9th, 2009 by Dr. Warthan
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Oh man.  Super nice models of the Nautilus (Disney version) from the Nautilus Drydocks (go there for more pictures).  I’m loowking at the 66-inch model, and there’s exceptional attention to detail.  You could almost shoot with this as the hero model.  Even the wheelhouse is fully detailed.

Nautilus

They even have additional options to convert it to a Radio Controlled sub that can go into the water.  But you’ll never catch me putting such a toy into the drink.  Knowing my luck, somebody with a model HMS Warrior would come along and sink my sub.

New Full Trailer for 9

Posted in Movie, SteamPunk on May 20th, 2009 by Dr. Warthan
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A more in-depth look at the upcoming must see movie.

If 9 is unfamiliar to you, check my original post.

Important Safety Tip: A Gentlemen’s Duel

Posted in Movie, Romance, SteamPunk on May 3rd, 2009 by Dr. Warthan
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This Victorian-era animation is clever, witty, and funny. Guaranteed satisfaction, or your money back. Hint: watch the credits.

Horology: Complex Clockwork Writes the Time

Posted in SteamPunk, Technology on April 23rd, 2009 by Dr. Warthan
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Got $342,275 USD to blow on a clock?  Look no futher than a wind-up clock that writes the time on a piece of paper.  Bleeding-edge Swiss watch-maker Jacquet Droz invested ten years in engineering and building “La Machine a Ecrire le Temps” (the machine that writes time).  Personally, I was thinking that when I staff my mansion in New Zealand after overthrowing its government and installing myself as dictator, I could use this machine for punching employee time-cards.

By some coincidence, in the 18th century, Jacquet Droz’s founder used to build automaton dolls to help sell his watches. Manuel Emsch’s idea was to build a similar machine that would be useful for the new millennium.

There are more than 1,200 components, including 84 ball bearings, 50 cams and 9 belts inside the machine. Wind it up, press the button, and the time is written on a small pad using a stylus. Manuel Emsch, creative head of Montres Jacquet Droz, came up with the idea and passed it on to the engineers and artisans of the company. The mechanism is kept inside a case made of liquid crystal, so that you can conceal or reveal it whenever you want.

Via DVICE

Must Watch Movie: 9

Posted in Movie, SteamPunk on April 22nd, 2009 by Dr. Warthan
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In a time…  of post-apocalyptic destruction.  Mechanical ragdolls have risen from the ashes of the old world to replace mankind.  But in the darkness lies an evil robot monster that feeds on the souls of slain ragdolls.  Only ragdoll #9 is left to fight alone in a desperate attempt to save their dystopia, and free the undead.

This is now a big budget film with Tim Burton’s name stamped on it.  It was based on a short film of the same name.  The little mechanical ragdolls are cool.  The big movie website, and the original short-film on YouTube.  The plot (Wiki) is compelling, and the movie trailer makes it look very interesting.  I’m certainly going to see this on the big screen.  Oh, and watch the above trailer all the way through, because there’s two of them one after another.

Art with Imagination: Win

Posted in Art, SteamPunk on April 21st, 2009 by Dr. Warthan
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Now here’s how you do SteamPunk art, with imagination.  The technology is really at the edge of the story, and the story centers on the woman.  Looks like a space where a person really lives.  The attention to detail (unlike Mr. Steam Train), all the little objects and nick-nacks; it’s very well done.  This is a win.  More SteamPunk art.

prison_girl

She is trapped and hidden from the world. In this cozy, but gloomy room she has spend myriads of minutes that have turned out in one moment into single continuous thin cord. The only bond with the reality is that magic mirror on the wall. It shows her in some strange perspective everything that happens beyond this prison.

Flame War: The Modern InterWebs

Posted in InterWebs, Music, Technology on April 16th, 2009 by Dr. Warthan
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OMG, this is so funny.  I love these College Humor guys, and this parody of Billy Joel’s “We didn’t start the fire” masterfully captures the modern internet.  Also, I saw Billy Joel’s video debut on MTV back when they played video’s.  For anyone over 30, this should be a scarey wake up call.

I remember a world populated with Commodore 64’s, VCR’s the size of microwave ovens, microwave ovens the size of dog houses, cassette tapes coming in as 8-tracks went out, and you could smoke anywhere (bus, airplane, library, work, you name it).  I’m an IT professional, and the modern Internet is a very scarey place.  The future is cloud computing, wireless video and power and everything else, throw away data centers, and vertical farming.  Whoa, I need to live a life of solitude in my airship as it floats along the air currents high above civilization; kind of like that world in BioShock, but up in the sky…